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Resources & Information
Current list of NY State Certified Radon Testers
The Correct Way to Do Radon Testing
Current List of NY State Certified Radon Mitigation Contractors
NY Certified Radon Testing Information
Radiation & Radon Information
Radon-Resistant New Construction (RRNC)
EPA Radon PSAs
Radon Mitigation Standards
Radon Map of NY State
ASHI Code of Ethics
Carbon Monoxide Information
Septic System Information
Purifying a Well System
Mold Information and Treatment
Faulty Plastic Heating Vent Pipe
Lead Paint Information
Federal Pacific Electric Panel Problems
GFCI Information
Energy Saving Tips

Government Information
NYSDOH Order form for home radon test kit
Mold - Indoor Air
(EPA) General Radon Information
Asbestos in Your Home
Mold - Indoor Air (EPA)
Lead Paint (NYSDOH)
US Consumer Product Safety Commission
Wadsworth Center • NYS Department of Health
CNY Coalition for Healthy Indoor Air
American Association of Radon Scientists and Technologists


Radon-Resistant New Construction (RRNC)

Builders: Basic Techniques

All of the techniques and materials described below are commonly used in home construction. No special skills or materials are required when adding radon-resistant features as a new home is being built.

While the techniques may vary for different house foundations and building site requirements, the five basic features that builders should include to prevent radon from entering a home are:

Radon Resistant New Construction - House Illustration

1: Gravel: Use a 4-inch layer of clean, coarse gravel below the “slab,” also called the foundation. This layer of gravel allows the soil gases, which includes radon, that occur naturally in the soil to move freely underneath the house. Builders call this the “air flow layer” or “gas permeable layer” because the loose gravel allows the gases to circulate. NOTE:  In some regions of the country, gravel may be too expensive or unnecessary. Alternatives are allowed, such as a perforated pipe or a collection mat.

2: Plastic Sheeting or Vapor Retarder: Place heavy duty plastic sheeting (6 mil. polyethylene) or a vapor retarder on top of the gravel to prevent the soil gases from entering the house. The sheeting also keeps the concrete from clogging the gravel layer when the slab is poured.

3: A Vent Pipe: Run a 3-inch or 4-inch solid PVC Schedule 40 pipe, like the ones commonly used for plumbing, vertically from the gravel layer (stubbed up when the slab is poured) through the house’s conditioned space and roof to safely vent radon and other soil gases outside above the house. (Although serving a different purpose, this vent pipe is similar to the drain waste vent, DWV, installed by the plumber.) This pipe should be labeled "Radon System." Your plumber or a certified radon professional can do this.

4: Sealing and Caulking: Seal all openings, cracks, and crevices in the concrete foundation floor (including the slab perimeter crack) and walls with polyurethane caulk to prevent radon and other soil gases from entering the home.

5: Junction Box: Install an electrical junction box (outlet) in the attic for use with a vent fan, should,  after testing for radon, a more robust system be needed.

The cost to a builder of including radon-resistant features in a new home during construction can vary widely. Many builders routinely include these features in some of their homes. The cost to the builder of including these features is typically less than the cost to mitigate the home after construction. New home buyers may ask the builder about these features, and if not provided, may ask the builder to include them in the new home. If a home is tested after buyers move in and an elevated level of radon is discovered, the owners’ cost of fixing the problem can be much more. Constructing with RRNC in new homes can add value by protecting health and reducing costs for your customers.


Greg Haley Home Inspection LLC · 308 Fayette Dr. Fayetteville, NY 13066 · 315-559-6666 · greg@ghaley.com
Greg Haley is a full service home inspector near Syracuse NY, serving all of Onondaga and Madison counties. Services include residential home inspections, 48 hour radon testing, Granite countertop testing for radiation and radon, pest inspections, septic dye testing.